3D printed scale models

Back in 2007 Marie Wastiau (architect and co-owner of Wil-Ma) discovered 3D printing during her internship at an agency that was busy experimenting with 3D printers for scale models and conceptual ideas. Several years later Marie opened up her own agency Wil-Ma together with Allen Zimmerman. As with all starting businesses, time was scarce to create scale models by hand like they did studying. In fact they weren't making any scale models at all, despite the benefits of it. As 3D printing had evolved and improved in the past years and Marie still had a fondness for this technology, she decided it was now the right time to buy a 3D printer for her agency. That 3D printer - a Tripodmaker - enabled Wil-Ma not only to provide their clients with a scale model, it also proved to be a useful tool for form studies in the conceptual phase of the project.  

Watch the case in our video below:

3D printing architecture


"We were looking for a printer with a large volume capacity that was still affordable, and came across the Tripodmaker. The build height is of great importance to us, as we design taller buildings as well. On another note, we liked the idea of supporting a local startup, as we were very much in the same boat back then." says Marie Wastiau

3D printing architecture

CONCLUSION

Crafting a scale model by hand nowadays seems unnecessary and quite time-consuming, seeing as how the latest 3D renders offer stunning possibilities and time is a terrible thing to waste. However, the benefits of solid models are still unbeatable by any digital work. The insights they provide about volumes, shapes and balance remain absolutely priceless. 3D printing allows you to quickly create one every step of the way - even in the conceptual phase. It's as quick and easy as sending your existing digital model to your 3D printer.

3D printing architecture